Spell Points

( ⇪ Magic )

Table of Contents

The Day that Everything Changed

Among the most aged and learned scholars, a rumor circulates of a time when magic was cast without care or consequences. All that they know for certain is that the day Sigil the City of Doors disappeared along with its matriarch The Lady of Pain, the sky was opened to all peoples, but the nature of magic itself was changed forever.

Now, casting spells is permanently linked to the vitality of our own bodies. While we can now cast many spells each day, the most complex magicks once-memorized cannot be released as easily as simpler spells. Additionally, many spells now require complex and varied incantations and use the spellcasting itself merely as fuel.

The Lady of Pain, it would seem, not only could keep all of the gods out of Sigil, but truly was empowering all of us. We still have no idea why or what caused The Lady of Pain to rewrite reality and vanish, but it would appear that this wasn’t her first time doing so.

Foreword

In a nutshell: Spell Points are videogame-like MP where spellcasting is intrinsically linked to your vitality and stamina.

Table: Core Class Spell Points Per Day
Level Bard Cleric, Druid, Wizard Paladin, Ranger Sorcerer
1st 2 3
2nd 0 4 5
3rd 1 7 8
4th 5 11 0 14
5th 6 16 0 19
6th 9 24 1 29
7th 14 33 1 37
8th 17 44 1 51
9th 22 56 1 63
10th 29 72 4 81
11th 34 88 4 97
12th 41 104 9 115
13th 50 120 9 131
14th 57 136 10 149
15th 67 152 17 165
16th 81 168 20 183
17th 95 184 25 199
18th 113 200 26 217
19th 133 216 41 233
20th 144 232 48 249

The Spell Point (SP) system presented here allows casters to more freely pick and choose which spells they cast each day. While normally Hyperion characters (those that take the hyperion template) do not have access to spells in the traditional manner, non-Hyperion characters could have access.

Every spellcaster has a reserve of SP based on class and level. They may also have a reserve of 0-level Points (ZP), which are each only a tiny fraction of the power of an SP. Characters also gain bonus SP and ZP from a high ability score (just as a normal spellcaster would gain bonus spells from a high ability score). These SP and ZP provide the magical power behind the caster’s spells: He spends a number of SP or ZP appropriate to the spell’s level to cast the spell (see “Casting Spells” below). Once spent, SP and ZP are expended until either the caster has sufficient time to rest and prepare new spells (see “Preparing Spells” below) or his SP or ZP are recovered by another means.

A number of non-core classes use the SP progressions of core classes:

  • Bard column: Jester, Nightstalker, and Trickster Spellthief
  • Cleric column: Death Master, Shaman (oriental), Urban Druid, and Wu Jen.
  • Paladin column: Hexblade, Sohei, and Spellthief.
  • Sorcerer column: Beguiler, Dread Necromancer, Favored Soul, Shugenja, Warmage, and Mystic.
Table: Non-Core Class Spell Points Per Day (Part 1)
Level Archivist Artificer ( Infusion Points) Duskblade Healer Mystic Ranger Savant (arcane pool)
1st 4 2 2 6
2nd 6 3 3 8 1
3rd 11 6 4 16 2
4th 16 9 5 19 5
5th 26 17 11 36 8 0
6th 34 22 15 41 14 0
7th 49 22 21 64 19 1
8th 61 34 25 71 29 1
9th 82 41 35 105 37 1
10th 98 41 44 121 51 1
11th 114 50 54 137 63 4
12th 130 59 62 153 70 4
13th 146 66 77 169 84 9
14th 162 87 89 185 85 9
15th 178 101 103 201 92 10
16th 194 106 118 217 92 17
17th 210 124 137 233 104 20
18th 226 133 153 249 104 25
19th 242 144 179 265 109 26
20th 258 144 200 281 109 41
Table: Non-Core Class Spell Points Per Day (Part 2)
Level Savant (divine pool) Sha’ir Spellcaster (either) Spirit Shaman Spontaneous Cleric, Spontaneous Druid Adept, Magewright
1st 3 3 3 3 1
2nd 5 5 5 5 1
3rd 6 7 10 8 2
4th 13 12 15 13 2
5th 16 15 26 21 5
6th 29 28 36 29 5
7th 36 36 52 42 9
8th 54 52 67 54 9
9th 64 67 90 73 14
10th 1 80 81 106 89 14
11th 1 94 97 120 103 22
12th 1 110 111 136 119 22
13th 1 124 127 150 133 29
14th 4 140 141 166 149 29
15th 4 154 157 180 163 41
16th 9 170 171 196 179 41
17th 9 184 187 210 193 50
18th 10 200 201 226 209 50
19th 17 216 217 242 225 66
20th 20 232 233 258 241 66
Table: Bonus Spell Points
Score 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
12-13 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
14-15 - 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
16-17 - 1 4 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
18-19 - 1 4 9 16 16 16 16 16 16
20-21 - 2 5 10 17 26 26 26 26 26
22-23 - 2 8 13 20 29 40 40 40 40
24-25 - 2 8 18 25 34 45 58 58 58
26-27 - 2 8 18 32 41 52 65 80 80
28-29 - 3 9 19 33 51 62 75 90 107
30-31 - 3 12 22 36 54 76 89 104 121
-

The column headers are by maximum spell level available, so only your highest relevant spell level available counts when determining bonus SP.

Spell Slots to Spell Points

Most of the trappings of the old-style “Vancian casting” have been converted to a points system. Each class level’s base amount of SP is given by Table: Core Class Spell Points Per Day and Table: Non-Core Class Spell Points Per Day. For any level where you normally have 0-level spell slots, you have a number of ZP for that class equal to three + the number of total SP gained by that class at the earliest level at which it gains 1st-level spells. Your ZP thus can increase with the relevant ability score.

Bonus Spell Points and Bonus Spells

Any spellcaster who would normally receive bonus spells for a high ability score receives bonus Spell Points (SP) instead. In effect, the character can simply cast more of his spells each day. To determine the number of bonus SP gained from a high ability score, first find the row for the character’s ability score on Table: Bonus Spell Points . Use whichever ability score would normally award bonus spells for the character’s class (Wisdom for clerics and druids, Intelligence for wizards, and so forth).

Next, find the column for the highest level of spell the character is capable of casting based on his class level (even if he doesn’t have a high enough ability score to cast spells of that level). At the point where the row and column intersect, you find the bonus SP the character gains. This value can change each time his ability score undergoes a permanent change and each time his level changes.

A character who would normally receive bonus spells from a class feature (such as from wizard specialization or access to a domain) gets the spell slots of the appropriate levels, domains, and/or schools, but doesn’t get any extra SP or ZP.

For Example: A level 1 wizard with 11 INT has just one 1st-level spell slot, three 0-Level spell slots, 2 SP, and 5 ZP. With 16 INT they instead get one additional 1st-level spell slot and one additional SP. Thus they have three 0-level spell slots, two 1st-level spell slots, 3 SP, and 6 ZP. If that wizard is a specialist, they also get one additional specialist 0-Level spell slot and one additional specialist 1st-level spell slot, but nothing else (so three regular 0-level slots, two regular 1st-level slots, one specialist 0-level slot, one specialist 1st-level slot, 3 SP, and 6 ZP.

For class features that grant bonus spells of a non-fixed spell level (such as the dragon disciple’s bonus spells), the character instead gains a number of bonus SP equal to twice the highest spell level he can cast, minus 1 (minimum 1 point) each time he gains a bonus spell. This is a fixed value — it doesn’t increase later as the character gains levels — though later rewards may be larger as appropriate to the character’s spellcasting ability.

Preparing Spells

With Spell Points, spellcasters that normally prepare spells still prepare spells as normal. In effect, casters who prepare spells are essentially setting their list of “spells known” for a time, with some caveats. They can cast a given prepared spell any number of times per day from that slot, but each spell has a cooldown time before the spell for that slot can be cast again (more on that later). As such, it might be useful to prepare multiple copies of a spell, but it’s often not necessary. Unlike the SRD version of Spell Points, prepared casters must assign metamagic versions of spells to separate spell slots as normal.

Table: Prepared Spell Lock
Spell Level Lock Duration
0th~3rd 1 daily rest1
4th~6th 3 daily rests
7th~8th 5 daily rests
9th 7 daily rests

1 Same as in typical D&D 3.5

To counteract the “versatility = power” problem where casters outshine the entire party at once, we must rethink the meaning of “prepared” casting. Now preparing a spell “locks” the slot for a number of daily rests dependent on the spell’s level. Casting a spell does not on its own clear a spell slot. Only once you’ve had the necessary number of daily rests does the slot clear, allowing you to change the contents of the slot. In the meantime, you must still prepare spells for the day, the lock just always forces you to prepare that slot with that spell if possible. If it’s not possible to prepare that spell in that slot that day, the locked slot has no spell but is not cleared. If you use metamagic or prepare a lower-level spell in a higher-level slot, use the spell’s final slot level for determining the lock. You can, of course, choose to leave a spell slot open, but to use the slot you must prepare a spell in that slot as normal (which takes at least 15 minutes in the same conditions as normal for preparing spells).

For Example: Our specialist conjurer wizard prohibited evocation and illusion. They prepared Sleep and Shield in their regular 1st-level slots, with Mage Armor in their specialist 1st-level slot. They also prepared Detect Magic, Read Magic, and Mage Hand in their regular 0-level slots, with Acid Splash in their specialist 0-level slot. They can change out the spells in all of these spell slots after each daily rest. However, if they were a level 8 wizard and had 4th-level spell slots, as soon as they prepare a spell in a 4th-level slot, that slot must have that spell each day until the wizard has 3 more daily rests. After this, the slot unlocks and they can change its spell.

Spontaneous Spells

Characters who cast all their spells spontaneously — such as bards and sorcerers — don’t have to prepare spells. They can cast any spell they know by spending the requisite number of Spell Points (SP). Additionally, certain spontaneous spellcasting classes (like the bard and sorcerer) have small improvements made to their class features. Spontaneous spellcasters don’t have “cooldowns” or “spell locks” like prepared spellcasters.

For Example: A sorcerer technically has spell slots, but they don’t need to bother tracking them, as all they care about is their SP and ZP. A level 1 sorcerer with 11 CHA has 3 SP and 6 ZP which they can use as they please with their list of spells known. With 16 CHA they instead get one additional SP, and thus they have 4 SP and 7 ZP.

Characters with the ability to cast a limited number of spells spontaneously (such as druids, who can spontaneously cast a summon nature’s ally spell in place of another spell of the same level or higher) are always treated as having those spells prepared, without spending any of their allowed spell slots to do so. Thus, they can cast such spells any time they have sufficient SP. However, casting such a spell starts a cooldown in an appropriate chosen slot for a duration befitting the spontaneous spell’s level.

Meta Analysis: Under this system, the Healing domain becomes a relatively poor choice for good-aligned clerics, since they gain less of a benefit for that domain. See the Spontaneous Divine Casters variant for ways to solve that dilemma.

Additionally, the Spirit Shaman class becomes much more powerful because it “retrieves” spells but otherwise acts like a spontaneous-type spellcaster. The fact that a Spirit Shaman has relatively few spell retrieval slots minimizes this issue.

Regaining Spell Points With a Daily Rest

Spellcasters regain lost Spell Points (SP) whenever they could normally regain spells. Doing this requires the same amount of rest and preparation or concentration time as normal for the class. Without this period of rest and mental preparation, the caster’s mind isn’t ready to regain its power. SP are not divorced from the body; they are part of it. Using SP is mentally and physically tiring, and without the requisite period of rest, they do not fully regenerate. Any SP spent within the duration of a normal daily rest (usually 8 hours) count against a character’s daily limit and aren’t regained.

It’s also possible to regain spell points without a daily rest.

Casting Spells

Each spell costs a certain number of Spell Points (SP) to cast. The higher the level of the spell slot used (or would use), the more points it costs. Table: Spell Point Costs describes each spell’s cost.

Table: Spell Point Costs
Spell Level Spell Point Cost
0th 0
1st 1
2nd 3
3rd 5
4th 7
5th 9
6th 11
7th 13
8th 15
9th 17

0-level spells each cost one 0-level Point (ZP) to cast unless…

  1. metamagic raises the final slot level (which changes the base cost to use SP),
  2. you cast it in a higher-level slot (which changes the base cost to use SP), and/or
  3. you increase the number of damage dice (which adds an additional cost of SP).

Every time you cast a spell, you must first succeed on a Concentration check. Failure means the spell fails, you lose the SP, and a cooldown starts (if relevant, see below) as if you had cast the spell to no effect. This check happens before all other Concentration checks involved in casting a spell.

DC 5 + spell level

+ your current amount of Spell Point Burn for that class

For Example: Assume our wizard has 7 SP left, 3 Wizard Spell Point Burn and only one 1st-level slot prepared with lesser orb of acid (a 1st-level spell). To cast it for 1 SP they would need to first succeed on a DC 9 Concentration check.

Spellcasting is linked to your vitality; see “Vitalizing” below for more information. Spellcasters use their full normal caster level for determining the effects of their spells in this system, with one significant exception:

Spells that deal/heal a number of dice of damage or healing based on caster level (such as magic missile, searing light, lightning bolt, healing touch, or slashing darkness) deal/heal the dice of damage or healing as if cast by a character of the minimum level of that class. Spells that don’t deal/heal a number of dice of damage or healing based on caster level (such as produce flame, heal, or a cure/inflict spell) use the full caster level for everything.

Extra SP can be spent at the time of casting to increase the spell’s caster level by 1 for the purposes of dice of damage or healing, at a cost of 1 SP per caster level. This can’t exceed your own caster level, the normal maximum the caster set for the spell (such as for a scroll), or the inherent maximum of the spell.

For Example: At wizard level 8, casting lesser orb of acid for 1 SP has caster level 8 for its range, but minimum caster level 1 for the dice of damage, dealing 1d8 damage, with a 45 ft range. Doing the full 4d8 damage would require paying an additional 6 SP.
Table: Prepared Spell Cooldown
Spell Level Cooldown Delay
0th~3rd 1-hour cooldown
4th~6th 4-hour cooldown
7th~8th 12-hour cooldown
9th 1-day cooldown

To counteract the “nova” problem where casters expend massive amounts of SP all at once, we must rethink the meaning of “prepared” casting. Now, casting a prepared spell makes that slot (and thus that spell) unavailable for a “cooldown” time that lasts for at least an hour dependent on spell level. The cooldown expires the indicated amount of time later regardless of rest. If you use metamagic or prepare a lower-level spell in a higher-level slot, use the spell’s final slot level for determining the cooldown. A daily rest (that could end a spell lock) also ends all cooldowns currently in-effect.

Spell Point Burn

Spell Point Burn (SP Burn) is an inherent part of casting spells and also a new spell component for a few specific spells. It’s similar to nonlethal damage, in that SP Burn starts at zero and counts up. The more SP Burn you have, the harder it is to cast spells from that class. Additionally, as you gain SP Burn you also take a form of Ability Burn.

Keep track of SP Burn for each spellcasting class, as well as which ability score determines the Save DC. Once SP burn in a class rises to a higher multiple of 4, you take 1 Ability Burn to the Save DC ability score (ex. for Wizards it’s Intelligence and for Clerics it’s Wisdom). Track the chronological order of each point of this Ability Burn.

If the SP Burn for a particular class is not a multiple of 4, SP Burn eliminates at a rate of 1 per hour of rest until the amount of SP Burn for that class is equal to a multiple of 4 (or is zero). From then on, when a point of Ability Burn from SP Burn is recovered (such as from a daily rest, which is to each ability score), 4 SP Burn is eliminated, but only from the spellcasting class of the chronologically-oldest point of that ability burn.

Ability Burn caused by SP Burn recovers like other Ability Burn, except that all Ability Damage to that score and all ordinary Ability Burn to that score must fully recover first. If an ability score has Ability Burn from SP Burn from multiple spellcasting classes, it’s recovered in chronological order. A daily rest recovers SP Burn for every hour until it is at or reaches a multiple of 4 (at which point it stops until the daily rest is completed).

Certain feats (such as Hibernate) and effects (such as a Heward’s Fortifying Bedroll) can help increase the rate at which you naturally heal ability damage and thus ability burn. However, effects that would have you instantly recover as if fully rested do not recover any SP Burn or Ability Burn caused by SP Burn.

For Example: If a “Favored Soul / Cleric” gains 5 “Favored Soul” SP Burn, then gains 6 “Cleric” SP Burn, and then gains 4 more “Favored Soul” SP Burn, he ultimately has 3 Wisdom Ability Burn caused in chronological order by his Favored Soul class, then his Cleric class, and then by his Favored Soul class again. After 1 hour of rest, his 9 “Favored Soul” SP Burn drops to 8 and his 6 “Cleric” SP Burn drops to 5. After another hour of rest, his 8 “Favored Soul” SP Burn doesn’t decrease at all (since it’s currently a multiple of 4) and his 5 “Cleric” SP Burn drops to 4. Then, after one daily rest, he heals 1 Wisdom Ability Burn from natural healing. Since that first point of Wisdom Ability Burn was caused by his “Favored Soul” SP Burn, healing that point of Wisdom Ability Burn only heals 4 points of SP Burn for his Favored Soul class.

Burn Component

For spells with a burn component, the burn cost is how much SP Burn you accumulate when you finish casting the spell. Burn costs on those spells usually equal the number of SP spent when casting the spell. You cannot exceed your maximum SP in order to cast a spell with a burn cost (This is the only circumstance in which SP Burn inherently forbids casting a spell).

Vitalizing

In short:

  • Spell Point (SP) loss causes fatigue or exhaustion,
  • Being fatigued or exhausted usually causes SP loss, and
  • SP recovery removes fatigue and/or exhaustion, but
  • Removal of fatigue or exhaustion does NOT on its own inherently recover SP.

Spellcasters can potentially cast a great number of spells in a day, but every spell cast is a potential burden on the caster’s vitality. Reaching for and directing magical energy is a dangerous and taxing exercise, at least as difficult as heavy labor or prolonged exertion. In return, resting revitalizes the character more than a non-spellcaster.

Being a spellcaster changes your physiology. By becoming a spellcaster, your spells become linked to your vitality. Thus, you are always vulnerable to fatigue, exhaustion, and ability burn in all ways, and no character option, creature type or subtype, race, spell, power, item, or other effect can mitigate this. Effects that stop such an effect from reaching you (such as spell resistance, AC, or a desert outfit) can prevent it, but if you have an immunity or an effect that reduces the effects of fatigue, exhaustion, or ability burn specifically, it does not function against fatigue, exhaustion, or ability burn.

Fatigue and Exhaustion

GM’s Note: A fatigued character can neither run nor charge and takes a -2 penalty to Strength and Dexterity. While fatigued, doing something that fatigues you worsens it to exhaustion. Exhaustion is just like fatigue, except that the penalty to Strength and Dexterity becomes -6, and also your speed is halved. After 1 hour of complete rest, exhaustion lessens to fatigue. After 8 hours of complete rest, fatigued characters are no longer fatigued.

When the number of Spell Points (SP) in a spellcasting class falls to 1/2 of its normal maximum (round down) or less, the character becomes fatigued. When the number of SP in a spellcasting class falls to 1/6 of its normal maximum (round down) or less, the character becomes exhausted. For a multiclass spellcaster, if any spellcasting class’s SP drops to 1/2 (rounded down), all of them do (that one that dropped caused fatigue at 1/2 or exhaustion at 1/6). If you remove fatigue or exhaustion through magical means, determine fatigue or exhaustion once the character casts their next spell.

If a spellcaster is subjected to an effect that would make him fatigued or exhausted for a standard duration (the duration of the fatigued or exhausted condition) or conditional duration (such as dehydration, frostbite, poison, or disease), his SP in each spellcasting class drops to its 1/2 or 1/6 value as described earlier. If a spellcaster is subjected to an effect that would cause fatigue or exhaustion for a specific stated duration (such as with touch of fatigue, which has a duration in rounds, or ray of exhaustion, which has a duration in minutes), he does not lose SP, but is treated otherwise as being fatigued or exhausted as normal for that duration. Regardless of whether the fatigue or exhaustion has a standard duration or not, you’re vulnerable to it as described above.

For Example: If a spellcaster has a normal maximum SP of 48 (including all bonus SP), and their SP drops to 24 or less (1/2 of 48), they become fatigued (as the fatigued condition). If it drops to 8 or less (1/6 of 48), they become exhausted. Likewise, if their SP is above 24 and they’re afflicted with the fatigued status (as the standard duration) or dehydration (which has a conditional duration), their SP would drop to 24. If their SP is above 8 and they do anything that would cause the exhaustion status, their SP would drop to 8.

“Negligible Spellcaster” Fatigue Exceptions

If a spellcaster has a SP pool with a normal maximum of 1 or less (after applying bonus SP), he has a nearly negligible connection to magic for that class, so special exceptions apply as follows for that spellcasting class:

  1. The calculated values for “1/6”, “1/3”, “1/2”, and “2/3” of the normal SP maximum for that class all become equal to the normal SP maximum.
  2. He does not become fatigued or exhausted from his SP in that class dropping to less than their maximum.
  3. Whenever that spellcaster becomes fatigued or exhausted in a way that would cause SP loss, he does not lose any SP from that class.
For Example: A typical paladin is a spellcaster with a negligible connection to magic until paladin level 4. Even then, a paladin could still have a negligible connection to magic through paladin level 9 if their WIS score isn’t high enough to grant bonus SP. As such, low level paladins essentially ignore all of the vitalizing rules.

A typical paladin with WIS 16 at paladin level 4 has 1 SP, so they treat their calculated values for “1/6”, “1/3”, “1/2”, and “2/3” each as a “1”. If their SP drops to 0 then they don’t become fatigued or exhausted. Likewise, if they become fatigued or exhausted in a way that would cause SP loss then they do not drop to 0 SP.

A non-spellcasting paladin (CW p13, or “Holy Warrior” CC p49) doesn’t care at all about vitalizing since they’re not a spellcaster.

Exceeding Your Maximum

A spellcaster can exceed his normal pool of Spell Points (SP) or 0-level Points (ZP) in order to cast a spell, but at great personal risk. To exceed your maximum on a 0-level spell, you must be ready to cast it from a higher-level slot (changing its cost to use SP, and then if you have that much SP left you can just cast it without exceeding your maximum at all). For any spell, exceeding your maximum successfully requires a Concentration check as described below. This replaces the normal Concentration check required to cast a spell described above . Regardless of success or failure on the Concentration check, the attempt expends any remaining SP he has in that class and also causes him to take Spell Point Burn (SP Burn) for that class equal to the number of excess SP needed to cast the spell.

The Concentration check to cast a spell that also exceeds your maximum is instead…

DC 20 + spell level

+ your current amount of SP Burn for that class

- your remaining SP in that class

+ the number of excess SP needed from that class

For Example: If a level 1 sorcerer with 1 SP and 0 ZP wants to cast another of their known 0-level spells, they can just cast it using their one remaining SP and not have to exceed their maximum at all. If a level 1 wizard with 0 SP, 0 ZP, and 2 Wizard SP Burn wants to cast another 0-level spell, they must have prepared it in a higher-level slot (making it cost 1 SP), and then succeed on a DC 23 Concentration Check (spell level 0, SP Burn 2, remaining SP 0, excess SP needed 1). If a level 7 wizard with 3 SP and 2 Wizard Spell Point Burn has only one 1st-level slot prepared with lesser orb of acid (a 1st-level spell), to cast it for the full 4d8 acid damage they’d need to spend 1 SP plus an additional 6 SP to boost the dice of damage back to full, so they’d have to succeed on a DC 24 Concentration check (spell level 1, SP Burn 2, remaining SP 3, excess SP needed 4).

Regaining Spell Points Without a Daily Rest

In addition to spontaneous-type casters getting a form of Auto-Regen, spellcasters in-general can rest in the middle of the day to recover all of their ZP and a fraction of their Spell Points (SP). However, to recover all of their SP, they require a daily rest as normal. In-general, any opportunity that would allow a spellcaster to recover some number of SP also recovers all of that class’s ZP, even if that SP value is already maxed-out for that opportunity.

If a spellcaster rests for 1 hour, all of his SP pools rise to 1/3 of their normal maximums (round this fraction up), all ZP for each of his spellcasting classes are recovered, and exhaustion (if he’s exhausted) is improved to fatigue (just like a non-spellcaster). A second consecutive hour of rest increases the spellcaster’s SP pools to 2/3 of their normal maximums (round this fraction up) and removes fatigue (if he’s fatigued; this recovery ability is unique to spellcasters). Remember that each hour of rest also recovers Spell Point Burn as described above. It takes a daily rest to replenish the highest 1/3 of his SP. As a general rule, no effect other than a daily rest can cause a SP pool to regain SP in excess of 2/3 of that SP pool’s normal maximum. For example, the caster can take any number of 1-hour or 2-hour rests, but he won’t recover the highest 1/3 of his SP until he has a daily rest as normal. Hours of rest that recover a fraction of your SP can be included as part of a daily rest.

For Example: If a spellcaster has a normal maximum SP of 48 (including all bonus SP), and their SP drops to 8 or less (1/6 of 48), they become exhausted (as the exhausted condition). If they’re a wizard with 5 Wizard SP Burn, and rest for 1 hour, their exhaustion will lessen to fatigue, their SP will rise to 16 (1/3 of 48), they’ll recover all spent ZP, and recover 1 Wizard SP Burn. If they continue resting for a second hour, their fatigue will be eliminated, their SP will rise to 32 (2/3 of 48), and their SP Burn won’t recover at all because it’s already at a multiple of 4. The wizard would need to complete a daily rest to recover their top 16 SP and recover the next 4 SP Burn.

If a spellcaster has more than one SP pool (i.e. from multiclassing), all aspects of SP and ZP recovery from rest affect all of those SP and ZP pools at once (although they may have different SP maximums and thus different fractions).

There are also two new spells (mana restoration and lesser mana restoration) which recover SP and ZP (usually encountered in the form of potions) regardless of rest. Additionally, pure-spontaneous spellcasting classes recover all ZP and some SP regardless of rest every 15 minutes at the same rate as a psionic character of a manifester level equal to that caster’s Caster Level (CL) on top of all other means of regaining SP available to prepared casters. However, the number of SP recovered for these or similar methods has “special restrictions” detailed in the exceptions below.

While a Memento Magicka (or similar effect) for spontaneous-type casters only recovers all ZP and some number of SP, a Pearl of Power (or similar effect) does that for prepared casters and ends the cooldown on the chosen spell and all of their 0-level spells. Effects that clear a spell slot (as if it was never prepared) likewise remove a lock on that spell slot.

Single-Classed Spellcaster Recovery Limits

If a spellcaster has only one spellcasting class and an item, spell, or effect would cause them to recover a specific number of spell slots or SP (as opposed to a fraction) without rest, there are limits to how much SP they actually recover (they also recover all ZP in that class even if that SP value is already maxed-out):

  1. If the affected spellcaster is exhausted in a way that causes SP loss when the effect occurs, then the effect can’t cause that SP pool to exceed 1/3 its normal maximum (round this fraction up). If the effect would cause that SP pool to exceed 1/6 its normal maximum, their exhaustion is improved to fatigue when the effect resolves.
  2. If the affected spellcaster is not exhausted in a way that causes SP loss when the effect occurs (being fatigued counts as “not exhausted”), then the effect instead can’t cause that SP pool to exceed 2/3 of its normal maximum (round this fraction up).
  3. If the affected spellcaster is fatigued in a way that causes SP loss when the effect occurs and the effect would cause that SP pool to exceed 1/2 of its normal maximum, then their fatigue (if any) is eliminated when the effect resolves.
For Example: If a spellcaster has a normal maximum SP of 48 (including all bonus SP), but is currently at 7 SP (exhausted), and they drink a caster level 10 potion of mana restoration, they would recover at most 30 SP and all ZP. However, 1/3 of their SP maximum is 16, so it instead recovers their SP to 16 (and their exhaustion improves to fatigue). If they then drank another caster level 10 potion of mana restoration, since 2/3 of their SP maximum is 32, they would only recover to 32 SP (and would no longer be fatigued).

Multiclassed Spellcaster Recovery Limits

If a spellcaster has more than one spellcasting class and an item, spell, or effect would cause them to recover a specific number of spell slots or SP (as opposed to a fraction) without rest, there are limits to how many they actually recover (they also recover all ZP in any class that would recover SP even if that SP value is already maxed-out):

  1. If the affected spellcaster is exhausted in a way that causes SP loss when the effect occurs, then the effect can’t cause any of his SP pools to exceed 1/6 their normal maximums unless the effect would cause all of his SP pools to do so. If the effect would cause all of his SP pools to do so, then the effect instead can’t cause any of his SP pools to exceed 1/3 their normal maximums (round this fraction up) and his exhaustion is improved to fatigue when the effect resolves.
  2. If the affected spellcaster is fatigued in a way that causes SP loss when the effect occurs, then the effect cannot cause any of his SP pools to exceed 1/2 their normal maximums unless the effect would cause all of his SP pools to do so. If the effect would cause all of his SP pools to do so, the effect instead can’t cause any of his SP pools to exceed 2/3 their normal maximums (round this fraction up) and his fatigue is eliminated when the effect resolves.
  3. If the affected spellcaster is neither fatigued in a way that causes SP loss nor exhausted in a way that causes SP loss when the effect occurs, then the effect can’t cause any of his SP pools to exceed 2/3 their normal maximums (round this fraction up).

“Negligible Spellcaster” Recovery Limit Exceptions

If a spellcaster has a SP pool with a normal maximum of 1 or less (after applying bonus SP), he has a nearly negligible connection to magic for that class, so special exceptions apply as follows for that spellcasting class:

  1. If all of his spellcasting classes are “negligible”, he does not eliminate fatigue after a second consecutive hour of rest.
  2. If he has multiple spellcasting classes, regarding the effects of recovering a specific number of spell slots or SP (as described above for multiclassed spellcasters), his negligible spellcasting classes are always treated as if they would exceed 1/6 of their normal maximums in the first case or 1/2 of their normal maximums in the second case.

Metamagic And Spell Points

Apply an additional Spell Point (SP) cost to any spell cast with a metamagic feat. This option allows a character maximum flexibility in his choice of spellcasting. Effectively, the character must pay for the spell (including cooldown and lock) as if it were a higher-level spell, based on the adjustment from the metamagic feat. If the metamagic effect(s) would increase the spell’s final slot level above what he is capable of casting, he can’t cast the spell in that way.

Metamagic doesn’t change the spell’s caster level for dice-damage-dealing effects. For instance, a quickened fireball still deals damage as if cast by a 5th-level caster unless the caster chooses to pay additional SP to increase the caster level.

Multiclass Spellcasters

A character with spellcasting ability from multiple classes (such as a cleric/wizard or bard/sorcerer) has a separate pool of Spell Points (SP) for each spellcasting class. Such characters may only spend SP on spells granted by that class. Bonus SP from a high ability score apply to each pool separately, even if the same ability score is tied to more than one spellcasting class. In the rare situations when a character has prepared or knows the same spell in two different slots (such as a druid/ranger preparing delay poison as both a 2nd-level druid spell and a 1st-level ranger spell), the character can cast the spell using either pool of SP, but the spell is treated as being cast by a caster of the level of the class from which the SP are drawn.

Miscellaneous Issues

When a character would lose a spell slot as part of another effect (such as from gaining a negative level), he instead loses the number of Spell Points (SP) required to cast a spell of that slot’s level. These SP cannot be recovered except by effects that remove the effect that caused the original loss of the spell slot.

Spells and effects that allow a character to recall or re-cast a spell don’t function the same way in this system. Items that recover spell energy (such as a pearl of power or memento magicka) restore a number of SP required to cast a spell of that level, remove the cooldown on the chosen spell slot (if relevant), recover all ZP for that class, and remove all cooldowns on that class’s 0-level spell slots (if relevant). A 3rd-level pearl of power, for instance, when activated would restore 5 SP to a chosen prepared SP pool, remove any cooldown delay currently on the chosen spell slot, etc. However, the amount of SP recovered by those kinds of effects has restrictions.

Item Creation

Because when casting a spell that has a higher dice-based-effect you have to expend more Spell Points, crafting a spell effect magic item with a higher dice-based-effect than the minimum requires a higher CL. This can only be done at specific caster levels depending on the level of the spell as noted on the table below.

Table: Item Creation for Spells with Dice-Based Effects
Spell Level Minimum Casting CL If you want this CL for the Dice-Based-Effects… …you must use this CL when crafting the item.
0 or 1 1 2,3,4,etc. 3,5,7,etc.
2 3 4,5,6,etc. 5,7,9,etc.
3 5 6,7,8,etc. 7,9,11,etc.
4 7 8,9,10,etc. 9,11,13,etc.

Caster levels are chosen at item creation. Notate the CL used for the spell effect item as an expression of “dice-effects vs non-dice-effects”. For example:

  • “CL 5” for a lowest-level wand of fireball
  • “CL 5/6” for a lowest-damage wand of fireball that uses CL 6 for non-dice-effects
  • “CL 6/7” for a wand of fireball with CL 6 for dice-effects and CL 7 otherwise.

Spell Points

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