Imported Skills

( ⇪ House Rules )

Certain skills have uncommon uses. Sections that have been modified by house rules or for this campaign setting are marked in red.

GM’s Note: I opted to only include the uncommon uses for a few skills here for now. There may be other uncommon skill uses in the Imports document, but you’ll have to go look them up.
GM’s Note: There are new skill uses unique to this setting as well as clarifications on a few skills .

Table of Contents

Bluff

Lie

(Inspired by homebrew by Rich Burlew)

Use bluff to convince someone that you yourself believe a specific falsehood. This replaces the bluff rules for lying in the SRD.

You can assert a false statement to another creature with your words; a Bluff check can then persuade them that you believe the statement to be true. A forgery or disguise may be needed to provide authority and clout to your statement, otherwise the target would have little reason to believe that your claim is factual (even if they believe that you think the claim is true). Attempting such a lie without the appropriate authority always causes the bluff to fail, but usually only causes the target to ask for proof or clout of some kind. Once the proof is provided, use the original bluff result as normal.

The DC for the Bluff check is based on three factors: who the target is, the relationship between the target and the character making the check, and the risk vs. reward factor of accepting the asserted statement.

Here’s a quick reference table (details for each section are given below the table).

Table: The Lie Check
The Target The Relationship Risk vs. Reward Judgement
When the target is already suspicious of you (such as because they have a specific reason to think you’re lying), use a 3d6 (an opposed roll).
Otherwise, use DC 10.

After which…
+ CR (if NPC) or ECL (if PC) of the creature
+ the Sense Motive modifier of the creature.
-10 Intimate
-7 Friend
-5 Ally
-2 Acquaintance (Positive)
+0 Just Met
+2 Acquaintance (Negative)
+5 Enemy
+7 Personal Foe
+10 Nemesis
-10 Fantastic
-5 Favorable
+0 Even
+5 Unfavorable
+10 Horrible

The Target

It’s an opposed roll when the target of the lie is suspicious of you. If the target is not suspicious of you, they aren’t actively trying to discern a lie, so use a base DC of 10.

High-level characters are more committed to their views and are less likely to be convinced; high Sense Motive characters are more likely to perceive the speaker’s real motives and aims regardless of their own level.

The Relationship

Whether they love, hate, or have never met each other, the relationship between two people always influences any lie.

Intimate: Someone who with whom you have an implicit trust. Example: A lover or spouse.

Friend: Someone with whom you have a regularly positive personal relationship. Example: A long-time buddy or a sibling.

Ally: Someone on the same team, but with whom you have no personal relationship. Example: A cleric of the same religion or a knight serving the same king.

Acquaintance (Positive): Someone you have met several times with no particularly negative experiences. Example: The blacksmith that buys your looted equipment regularly.

Just Met: No relationship whatsoever. Example: A guard at a castle or a traveler on a road.

Acquaintance (Negative): Someone you have met several times with no particularly positive experiences. Example: A town guard that has arrested you for drunkenness once or twice.

Enemy: Someone on an opposed team, with whom you have no personal relationship. Example: A cleric of a philosophically-opposed religion or an orc bandit who is robbing you.

Personal Foe: Someone with whom you have a regularly antagonistic personal relationship. Example: An evil warlord whom you are attempting to thwart, or a bounty hunter who is tracking you down for your crimes.

Nemesis: Someone who has sworn to do you, personally, harm. Example: The brother of a man you murdered in cold blood.

Risk vs. Reward Judgement

The amount of personal benefit to the listener must always be weighed against the potential risks to the listener for a lie. It is important to consider this from the perspective of the NPC and what they might value; a paladin might be convinced that the greater good would benefit by believing that you believe the lie. Further, it’s important to note that this risk is based on whether they believe that you believe the lie, and whether the lie matters enough to them for it to be a risk to them. As such, dependent on the lie itself, the risk may be “even” even if the risk would be dire in-general, because the lie doesn’t significantly affect them in any way. A lie about a terrorist attack happening in another country may not matter in the slightest to a homeless person living on the streets where you are now, as believing that you believe it doesn’t really affect them at all.

Fantastic: The personal benefits for the listener to believe that you believe the lie are very worthwhile, and the risk is either acceptable or extremely unlikely. The best-case scenario is a virtual guarantee. Example: Telling someone what they desperately want to hear.

Favorable: The personal benefits are good, and the risk is tolerable. The listener thinks the lie will end up benefiting him, if it’s true. Example: Reaffirming what the person already believed likely.

Even: The personal and benefits and risk are more or less even, or the lie involves neither reward nor risk. Example: A white lie that’s believable and doesn’t affect the target much.

Unfavorable: The personal benefits are not enough compared to the risk involved; even if your lie were true, chances are the end result will end up badly for the listener. Example: The bluff is a little hard to believe or puts the target at some risk.

Horrible: There is no conceivable way the lie could end up with the listener ahead, or the worst-case scenario is guaranteed to occur. Example: The bluff is hard to believe or puts the target at significant risk.

Success or Failure

If the Bluff check beats the DC, the subject believes that as far as you know the lie is true. If the check fails by 5 or less, the subject is unsure about the lie, but may ask another question to make sure (invoking another bluff check, if necessary, which may prompt more questions). If the check fails by 10 or more, the Bluff is over; the subject immediately recognizes that you’re lying, and may become hostile or take other steps to end the conversation. A lie automatically fails if it’s utterly implausible, even if the Bluff check beats the DC.

Action

Lying can take a free action in combat (within reasonable speaking limits) or be part of normal conversation. If the lie is complex, this time requirement may greatly increase and require multiple Bluff checks for each part of the lie. If time spent is important and a player is unsure of how much time it would take to present the lie to the NPC, they should preface that worry to the GM first instead of just presenting the lie.

Try Again

No, unless the subject asks another question about the lie which prompts another Bluff check. Of course, you could always try the lie out on another person. For every instance of you presenting the lie to another person they trust while in their presence, your Bluff check against the person gets a +2 circumstance bonus if the person believed you, or -2 circumstance penalty if the person didn’t believe you.

Craft

(ECS 46)

Repair Living Construct: A character with ranks in certain Craft skills can attempt to repair a living construct character who has taken damage. A check requires 8 hours and restores a number of hit points equal to the Craft check result –15. A character can take 10 on this check but can’t take 20. Other constructs can’t be repaired in this way (but a character with the Craft Construct feat can repair such a construct, as described on page 303 of the Monster Manual).

Applicable Craft skills include armorsmithing, blacksmithing, gemcutting, and sculpting. A warforged with an applicable Craft skill can repair itself.

Decipher Script

Creating a Cipher

(CAd 98)

You can use the Decipher Script skill to create a private cipher. This code system allows you (or anyone with the proper key) to record information without the risk of others reading it. Any document you create using your private cipher can be read only by you or someone who has the proper decoding information. Other characters with ranks in the Decipher Script skill can attempt to decipher the code. The DC for such a decoding attempt is 10 + your total skill modifier at the time that you create the cipher. (In effect, you “take 10” on a skill check to create the cipher, and those attempting to decode it make a Decipher Script check opposed by your take 10 result.)

Action: Creating a cipher takes a week of uninterrupted work. The first attempt to decipher a code system created by the Decipher Script skill requires a day of uninterrupted work, and subsequent retries each take a week’s time.

Try Again: You can attempt to decipher a private cipher more than once, but you must spend a great deal of time on each retry attempt. Each attempt to decipher a code beyond your first attempt takes a week’s worth of uninterrupted work. The first attempt to decipher a code system requires only one day’s work.

Diplomacy

Given the new “Persuasion” option below, Diplomacy checks by default instead just determine whether they’ll give you the time of day (usually in which you would then attempt persuasion). For example, this new default use of “diplomacy” could have someone give you the same time of day as they would automatically give a friend. Diplomacy (for persuasion or otherwise) cannot be used against PCs (either by the GM or otherwise).

Persuasion

( Homebrew ; by Rich Burlew, contributor to MM3, SpC, Dungeonscape, etc.)

Use diplomacy to ask the local baron for assistance, to convince a band of thugs not to attack you, or to talk your way into someplace you aren’t supposed to be.

You can propose a trade or agreement to another creature with your words; a Diplomacy check can then persuade them that accepting it is a good idea. Either side of the deal may involve physical goods, money, services, promises, or abstract concepts like “satisfaction.” The DC for the Diplomacy check is based on three factors: who the target is, the relationship between the target and the character making the check, and the risk vs. reward factor of the deal proposed.

Here’s a quick reference table (details for each section are given below the table).

Table: The Persuasion Check
The Target The Relationship Risk vs. Reward Judgement
Base DC 15
+ CR of the highest-level character in the group that you are trying to influence
+ the Wisdom modifier of the character in the group with the highest Wisdom.
-10 Intimate
-7 Friend
-5 Ally
-2 Acquaintance (Positive)
+0 Just Met
+2 Acquaintance (Negative)
+5 Enemy
+7 Personal Foe
+10 Nemesis
-10 Fantastic
-5 Favorable
+0 Even
+5 Unfavorable
+10 Horrible
+X Impossible*

* Some people cannot be persuaded of that specific thing or of anything. You might be able to get them to hesitate, but that’s it.

The Target

High-level characters are more committed to their views and are less likely to be swayed; high Wisdom characters are more likely to perceive the speaker’s real motives and aims. By applying the highest modifiers in any group, a powerful king (for example) might gain benefit from a very wise advisor who listens in court and counsels him accordingly. For this purpose, a number of characters is only a “group” if they are committed to all following the same course of action. Either one NPC is in charge, or they agree to act by consensus. If each member is going to make up their mind on their own, roll separate Diplomacy checks against each.

The Relationship

Whether they love, hate, or have never met each other, the relationship between two people always influences any request.

Intimate: Someone who with whom you have an implicit trust. Example: A lover or spouse.

Friend: Someone with whom you have a regularly positive personal relationship. Example: A long-time buddy or a sibling.

Ally: Someone on the same team, but with whom you have no personal relationship. Example: A cleric of the same religion or a knight serving the same king.

Acquaintance (Positive): Someone you have met several times with no particularly negative experiences. Example: The blacksmith that buys your looted equipment regularly.

Just Met: No relationship whatsoever. Example: A guard at a castle or a traveler on a road.

Acquaintance (Negative): Someone you have met several times with no particularly positive experiences. Example: A town guard that has arrested you for drunkenness once or twice.

Enemy: Someone on an opposed team, with whom you have no personal relationship. Example: A cleric of a philosophically-opposed religion or an orc bandit who is robbing you.

Personal Foe: Someone with whom you have a regularly antagonistic personal relationship. Example: An evil warlord whom you are attempting to thwart, or a bounty hunter who is tracking you down for your crimes.

Nemesis: Someone who has sworn to do you, personally, harm. Example: The brother of a man you murdered in cold blood.

Risk vs. Reward Judgement

The amount of personal benefit must always be weighed against the potential risks for any deal proposed. It is important to consider this from the perspective of the NPCs and what they might value; while 10 gp might be chump change to an adventurer, it may represent several months’ earnings for a poor farmer. Likewise, a paladin is unlikely to be persuaded from his tenets, though he might be convinced that a greater good is served by the proposed deal. When dealing with multiple people at once, always consider the benefits to the person who is in clear command, if any hierarchy exists within the group.

Fantastic: The reward for accepting the deal is very worthwhile, and the risk is either acceptable or extremely unlikely. The best-case scenario is a virtual guarantee. Example: An offer to pay a lot of gold for something of no value to the subject, such as information that is not a secret.

Favorable: The reward is good, and the risk is tolerable. If all goes according to plan, the deal will end up benefiting the subject. Example: A request to aid the party in battle against a weak goblin tribe in return for a cut of the money and first pick of the magic items.

Even: The reward and risk are more or less even, or the deal involves neither reward nor risk. Example: A request for directions to someplace that is not a secret.

Unfavorable: The reward is not enough compared to the risk involved; even if all goes according to plan, chances are it will end up badly for the subject. Example: A request to free a prisoner the subject is guarding (for which he or she will probably be fired) in return for a small amount of money.

Horrible: There is no conceivable way the proposed plan could end up with the subject ahead, or the worst-case scenario is guaranteed to occur.

Success or Failure

If the Diplomacy check beats the DC, the subject accepts the proposal, with no changes or with minor (mostly idiosyncratic) changes. If the check fails by 5 or less, the subject does not accept the deal but may, at the DM’s option, present a counter-offer that would push the deal up one place on the risk-vs.-reward list. For example, a counter-offer might make an Even deal Favorable for the subject. The character who made the Diplomacy check can simply accept the counter-offer, if they choose; no further check will be required. If the check fails by 10 or more, the Diplomacy is over; the subject will entertain no further deals, and may become hostile or take other steps to end the conversation.

Action

Making a request or proposing a deal generally requires at least 1 full minute. In many situations, this time requirement may greatly increase.

Try Again

If you alter the parameters of the deal you are proposing, you may try to convince the subject that this new deal is even better than the last one. This is essentially how people usually haggle. As long as you never roll 10 or less than the DC on your Diplomacy check, you can continue to offer deals.

Synergy

There are no synergy bonuses in this setting. Lying as part of trying to persuade someone requires a Lie check, and succeeding or failing at that lie may or may not influence their decision.

Haggle

(CAd 98)

You can use the Diplomacy skill to bargain for goods or services, including those of a magical nature. When discussing the sale of an item or service, you can attempt to lower the asking price with a Diplomacy check made to influence NPC attitudes. If you manage to adjust the vendor’s attitude to helpful (most vendors begin as indifferent), the vendor lowers the asking price by 10%. Add the vendor’s Diplomacy check modifier to the DC needed to achieve the result. For example, to adjust the attitude of an indifferent vendor with a Diplomacy modifier of +3 to friendly, you must achieve a result of 33 or higher on your Diplomacy check (a base chance of 30, +3 for target’s Diplomacy modifier). If you worsen the vendor’s attitude, the vendor refuses to sell anything to you at this time. The DM is the final arbiter of any sale of goods and should discourage abuse of this option if it is slowing the game down too much.

Action: Haggling requires at least 1 full minute, as normal for a Diplomacy check.

Try Again: You can’t retry a Diplomacy check to haggle.

Mediate

(CAd 99)

In order to mediate a disagreement, you must succeed in adjusting each group’s attitude to friendly or better toward the other party in the negotiation. Make a Diplomacy check as normal for influencing NPC attitudes, but add the group leader’s Diplomacy check modifier to the DC needed to achieve the result. For example, to adjust the attitude of an unfriendly group led by an individual with a Diplomacy modifier of +7 to friendly, you would need to roll a result of 32 or higher on your Diplomacy check (a base chance of 25, +7 for target’s Diplomacy modifier). If your check result is less than 12 (a base chance of less than 5, +7 for target’s Diplomacy modifier), the target’s attitude worsens to hostile. The DC increases by 5 if the two parties are of different cultures or races.

Action: Mediation is a long process and cannot often be rushed successfully. Each check requires a full day of game time. You can take a –10 penalty on the check if you wish to attempt a mediation in an hour instead of a day (such as staving off an impending battle).

Try Again: As long as both sides aren’t hostile (that is, as long as at least one side remains unfriendly or better), you can retry a Diplomacy check made to mediate a disagreement. If both parties become hostile at any time after the first check is made, you can’t retry the check.

Disable Device

What Disabling a Trap Means

(DMG)

So a character makes her Disable Device check against a trap. What does that success do to the trap? The answer to that question depends on the amount by which the character beat the DC. Check the paragraph below that corresponds to the margin of success.

Check Result = DC +0–3: The next time the trigger would spring the trap, it doesn’t. After that, however, the trigger operates normally, and another Disable Device check is required to disarm it again.

Check Result = DC +4–6: The character messed up the trap’s workings. It won’t function again until it’s reset. If it’s a trap that resets automatically, use the next result below.

Check Result = DC +7–9: The character really broke the trap. It won’t go off again until someone repairs it using the Craft (trapmaking) skill. This repair costs 1d8×10% of the trap’s total construction cost.

Check Result = DC +10 or more: The character either broke the trap (as above) or succeeded in adding or discovering a bypass element. This latter option enables characters to either get past the trap without triggering it or avoid its effect, but the trap remains active. For example, a character who achieves this degree of success on a Disable Device check could manage to prop open a spring-loaded trap so that it can’t fire, or could notice the niche in the wall that provides refuge from the rolling boulder.

Disguise

Provide Clout to a Lie

(Supporting rule to Lying)

A disguise may be needed to give authority and clout to a lie. A successful disguise (assuming the person believes that you are who you claim) makes some kinds of lies plausible (where they would otherwise be completely implausible).

Forgery

Provide Clout to a Lie

(Supporting rule to Lying)

A forgery may be needed to give authority and clout to a lie. A successful forgery (assuming the person believes the document) makes some kinds of lies plausible (where they would otherwise be completely implausible).

Hide

The Rules Compendium describes a number of special uses of this skill:

  • Blend into a Crowd: You can use the Hide skill to blend into a crowd, concealing you from someone scanning the area to find you.
  • Move between Cover: If you’re already hiding, you can try to move without revealing yourself.
  • Sneak up from Hiding: You can sneak up on someone after emerging from a hiding place.
  • Sniping: If you’re already hiding, you can make a ranged attack and then hide again.
  • Tailing: While moving on the local scale, you can follow someone while remaining unseen.

Intimidate

The Rules Compendium describes a number of special uses of this skill:

  • Demoralize Opponent: Give an opponent the shaken condition for 1 round.
  • Duel of Wills: When you’re about to roll initiative, you can gain bonuses against an opponent for that combat or for 1 round.

Profession (Astrologer)

(D340 p33)

(Wis; Trained Only)

Your facility with astrology allows you to make extraordinarily shrewd predictions about a person’s behavior. It allows you to cast horoscopes, offering clues about future auspicious and inauspicious actions.

Check: You can cast a horoscope for any living creature. You must know the subject’s astrological sign. Your predictive powers increase in accuracy the more information you know. (see Table: Horoscope DCs and Table: Horoscope DC Modifiers ) If successful, the horoscope determines an auspicious (lucky) and inauspicious (unlucky) action for a particular day. Roll 1d12 once for each chart (see Table: Auspicious Actions and Table: Inauspicious Actions )

Action: It takes considerable time to make a check and fashion a horoscope, requiring 1d4 hours to make calculations and draw charts.

Try Again: No. You may only attempt to cast a horoscope for a particular subject once for any given day. Other people that cast the horoscope get the same results, which do not stack.

Synergy: There are no synergy bonuses in this setting.

Table: Horoscope DCs
Horoscope DC Personal Information Known About Subject
30 Astrological Sign
25 Exact Date of Birth
20 Exact Time of Birth (within the hour)
Table: Horoscope DC Modifiers
Astrology Check Modifier Condition
+5 Subject’s exact place of birth known
-10 Attempting to determine an auspicious action without an inauspicious action
-5 Double the action bonus and penalty (this can only be applied once)
Table: Auspicious Actions
d12 Result
1 Listen to your survival instincts (+1 insight bonus on Reflex saving throws).
2 Attention to detail will be rewarded (+1 insight bonus when taking 10 or taking 20).
3 You bruise rarely (-1 on any damage against you with a bludgeoning attack).
4 Use sharp objects (+1 insight bonus on all attacks made with slashing weapons).
5 A good day to rely on your memory (+1 insight bonus on all Knowledge checks).
6 Confront the dead (+1 insight bonus on attack and damage rolls versus undead).
7 A good day for exercise (+1 insight bonus on Strength-based checks and skills).
8 Expect superb reflexes (+1 insight bonus on initiative checks).
9 Rely upon your surroundings (+1 insight bonus to AC when gaining a cover bonus).
10 Endure fire (+1 insight bonus on all saves versus fire attacks and effects).
11 Exploit your enemy’s moments of weakness (+1 insight bonus on attack and damage rolls when making attacks of opportunity).
12 A good day to make friends (+1 insight bonus on Charisma-based checks and skills).
Table: Inauspicious Actions
d12 Result
1 Ignore your survival instincts (-1 penalty on Reflex saving throws).
2 Attention to detail will be punished (-1 penalty when taking 10 or taking 20).
3 You bruise easily (+1 on any damage against you with a bludgeoning attack).
4 Avoid sharp objects (-1 penalty bonus on all attacks made with slashing weapons).
5 A bad day to rely on your memory (-1 penalty on all Knowledge checks).
6 Avoid that which is dead (-1 penalty on attack and damage rolls versus undead).
7 A bad day for exercise (-1 penalty on Strength-based checks and skills).
8 Expect poor reflexes (-1 penalty on initiative checks).
9 Don’t rely upon your surroundings (-1 penalty to AC when gaining a cover bonus).
10 Shun fire (-1 penalty on all saves versus fire attacks and effects).
11 Respect your enemy’s moments of weakness (-1 penalty on attack and damage rolls when making attacks of opportunity).
12 A bad day to make friends (-1 penalty on Charisma-based checks and skills).

Psicraft

See the entry below for Spellcraft . All appropriate psionic equivalents of Spellcraft also exist for Psicraft.

Sense Motive

The Rules Compendium describes a number of special uses of this skill:

  • Assess Opponent: Determine how challenging an opponent is in combat.
  • Discern Secret Message: Determine whether someone’s verbally transmitting a secret message, and what that message is.
  • Hunch: You can make a gut assessment of the social situation, such as whether someone’s an imposter or trustworthy.
  • Sense Enchantment: Detect whether someone’s behavior is being affected by an enchantment, such as domination.

Sleight of Hand

The Rules Compendium describes a number of special uses of this skill:

  • Hide an object on your person: DC = Searcher’s Search check +4
  • Make the check as a move action instead of a standard action: Check Modifier -20

Dagger Surprise

(CW 122, RC 117)

If you palm a dagger in combat, you can surprise your opponent when it suddenly appears in your hand.
Check: For this technique to work, you must be armed with a dagger, must have the Quick Draw feat, and must be holding nothing in your off hand. You must fight the same foe for at least 2 consecutive rounds to get your opponent used to the idea that you have nothing in your off hand. At the beginning of your turn during the third round, use Quick Draw to draw the sheathed dagger as a free action with your off hand. Then make a Sleight of Hand check opposed by your opponent’s Spot check. If you win, your foe is considered flat-footed for the next single attack you make with the dagger now in your off hand. Regardless of your success, the same foe won’t fall for the same trick from you twice during the same encounter.

Unobtrusive Spellcasting

(RoS 133, RC 117)

Sleight of Hand is a well-known skill of rogues, thieves, and street magicians everywhere. It also has a practical use to the magic-using world, allowing spellcasters to cast their spells while avoiding the notice of others.

Check: When casting a spell, you may make a Sleight of Hand check to make your verbal and somatic components less obtrusive, muttering magic words under your breath and making magic gestures within your sleeves. Your Sleight of Hand check is opposed by any observer’s Spot check. The observer’s success doesn’t prevent you from casting the spell, just from doing it unnoticed.

Action: None. You make the check as part of your normal spellcasting.

Try Again: Yes, but after an initial failure, you take a –10 penalty on a second Sleight of Hand attempt against the same target (or while the same observer who noticed your previous attempt is watching you).

Spellcraft

Determine Wild Magic Borders

(MoF 21)

Determining the exact borders of a wild magic area requires 3 rounds of study and succeeding on a DC 25 Spellcraft check.

Draw a Circle to Increase Caster Level

(MoF 21)

You can utilize Elven High Magic (MoF 13) to increase the caster level of an area spell by succeeding on a Spellcraft check with a DC equal to 20 + ( 5 × CL increase of the area spell ).

Drawing Clarifications

The Spellcraft check is not made until the circle is completed.

If you use chalk to draw such a circle, it requires a suitable surface and 1 round for every foot in the circumference (round down, minimum 5 rounds) and a new piece of chalk (costing 1 cp each) for every 20 feet in the circumference (round down, minimum 1 piece of chalk). This can be disrupted just like a Magic Circle spell’s powdered silver circle.

You can create a circle by magical methods much faster, most notably through the shape line of spells.

Identify Inscribed Rune

(MoF 21)

You can identify the spell held in an inscribed rune with a successful Spellcraft check with a DC of 15 + the spell level.

Identify Prepared Raw Material

(MoF 21)

You can identify whether a raw material has been prepared for magical crafting with a successful DC 25 Spellcraft check. No action required.

Identify Rune Circle

(RoS 133)

Check: When using read magic, you can identify the effects of a rune circle. The base DC is 10 + the caster level of the rune circle. You must first know that a magic rune circle is present, usually through the use of the detect magic spell.
If the check is successful, you know the powers of the circle and how to activate it.

Action: Deciphering the runes on a rune circle takes 1 minute (ten consecutive full-round actions).

Special: There are no synergy bonuses in this setting.

Identify Soulmeld

(MoI 34)

You can identify a shaped soulmeld with a successful DC 20 Spellcraft check. (You must be able to see the character wearing the soulmeld to be identified.) No action required. No retry.

Master a Foreign Spellbook

(MoF 21)

You can master the notations in another person’s spellbook, thereby enabling you to treat it as your own spellbook for the purposes of preparing or copying spells. This takes one hour and succeeding on a Spellcraft check with a DC equal to 25 + the highest spell level in the book.

Recognize Material as Magical

(MoF 21)

You can recognize a material as created by magic with a successful DC 20 Spellcraft check.

Recognize Shadow Weave Item

(MoF 21)

You can use detect magic to recognize a known magic item as a shadow weave item with a successful DC 20 Spellcraft check.

Reveal Self-Identifying Magic Item

(MoF 136)

Many powerful magic items, particularly minor artifacts, reveal their powers to anyone who holds them. When someone holds a self-identifying item and concentrates, she learns one of the item’s powers each minute until the item has revealed all its powers. The item always reveals powers in the order they are listed in the item’s description. A successful Spellcraft or bardic knowledge check (DC 20) reveals all the powers at once.

Any magic item other than a potion or scroll can be created as a self-identifying item. At the time of creation, the caster must decide if the item is self-identifying or not. This capability does not affect the price or creation time of an item, but once the item is finished, the decision is binding.

To determine if a randomly generated magic item is self-identifying, roll d%. An 01–40 result indicates that an item is self-identifying, and a 41–100 result indicates that it is not.

Imported Skills

Hyperion Voyages Ternal Ternal