Skill Descriptions

( ⇪ Skills, Feats, and Flaws )

GM’s Note: There are other uses for many skills imported from other books as well as clarifications on a few skills .

Table of Contents

Concentration

The following are additional uses for the Concentration skill.

Aim as a Move Action

You can as a move action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity make a Concentration check that will make the next ranged attack or ranged touch attack you make this round more accurate. Pick a target within line-of-sight and one or both of the following:

1. Reduce the total penalty you take on your ranged attack roll from range increments by a number equal to the check result – 10 (minimum reduction 0, maximum reduction is your Base Attack Bonus). You are still limited by the maximum range of your attack. If you don’t make a ranged attack before your next turn, or if you lose line-of-sight to your target, then this check is wasted.

2. When making a ranged called shot attack, reduce the bonus to AC for a body part being smaller by a number equal to the check result – 10 (minimum reduction 0, maximum reduction is half your Base Attack Bonus). You apply these reductions before determining your modifier for pressing your luck. If you don’t make a ranged called shot attack before your next turn, or if you lose line-of-sight to your target, then this check is wasted.

You can make both Concentration checks as part of the same move action, but they must be separate checks. The reductions stack with aiming as a swift action. You can be distracted during the move action as if you were casting a 0-level spell, but failing just means the move action is wasted.

Aim as a Swift Action

You can as a swift action (that does not provoke an attack of opportunity) make a Concentration check that will make the next ranged attack or ranged touch attack you make this round more accurate. Pick a target within line-of-sight and one or both of the following:

1. Reduce the total penalty you take on your attack roll from range increments by a number equal to the check result – 10 (minimum reduction 0, maximum reduction is your half your Base Attack Bonus). You are still limited by the maximum range of your attack. If you don’t make a ranged attack before your next turn, or if you lose line-of-sight to your target, then this check is wasted.

2. When making a ranged called shot attack, reduce the bonus to AC for a body part being smaller by a number equal to the check result – 10 (minimum reduction 0, maximum reduction is one-quarter your Base Attack Bonus). You apply these reductions before determining your modifier for pressing your luck. If you don’t make a ranged called shot attack before your next turn, or if you lose line-of-sight to your target, then this check is wasted.

You can make both Concentration checks as part of the same swift action, but they must be separate checks. The reductions stack with aiming as a move action. You can be distracted during the swift action as if you were casting a 0-level spell, but failing just means the swift action is wasted.

Intimidate

When you use the Demoralize Opponent option of this skill and succeed, you inflict strife equal to your Intimidate ranks, and then an additional + 1d6 strife if it causes the shaken condition as a fear effect (or more if they were already shaken as a fear effect, as then they’d be frightened or panicked). Even if they’re immune to fear effects, you still inflict strife equal to your number of Intimidate ranks. A second character using the demoralize opponent option in the same round would not escalate the opponent’s fear to the frightened condition, but would still inflict strife equal to that character’s Intimidate ranks (plus extra if the opponent is then subjected to a fear effect), and the shaken fear effect’s duration would continue until one round after that initiative.

Knowledge (Hypertechnology)

A class skill to anyone with “Knowledge (Arcana)”, “Knowledge (Psionics)” or “Knowledge (Architecture and Engineering)” in their class skill list. This skill represents an understanding of how to use hypertechnology. This skill also is used to determine success with uncommon uses of hypertechnology, such as hacking.

Hyperion devices with a primary purpose of arcane or divine origin do not count as hypertechnology.

You can use Knowledge (Arcana) to remember details about constructs with the hypertech subtype, except you can only use half your ranks (which prevents you from making the check outright if you only have 1 rank). If you’re trained in Knowledge (Hypertechnology), you can use that skill in place of Knowledge (Arcana), and you get to use your full number of ranks.

If you encounter technology that is similar to hypertechnology but isn’t of Hyperion origin, you make this check as normal but with half your ranks in Knowledge (Hypertechnology). You can add half of your combined ranks in Knowledge (Architecture and Engineering) and Knowledge (Xenolore) to these checks.

Hacking

Most of what people call “hacking” is essentially just the application of knowledge of hypertechnology and arcane devices to convince a set of networked constructs to do what you want despite you not normally having permission for that. Hacking requires the use of hypertooth interfaces as a medium, and you must be trained (have at least one rank) in both Knowledge (Hypertechnology) and Use Magic Device to hack.

Most forms of hypertechnology have at least two components (immobile constructs) on their internal network: the hypertooth interface, and the core. On rare occasions, the hypertooth interface and the core are the same component, but that would generally be considered an insecure system. While you can “talk” to the hypertooth interface (using your own hypertooth interface), the hypertooth interface and core communicate in their own unique language (called a “protocol”) that is impossible for you to perceive or understand (not even magically). Therefore, usually what you actually “hack” is the device’s hypertooth interface. The hypertooth interface then talks to the core on your behalf as if you were a legitimate user of that device and attempts to convince it to do what you want, such as open up a Cyberspace Access Point (“C.A.P.”). You must first locate and correctly identify the signal of a Hypertooth interface in order to hack it.

To “hack”, you make a complex skill check that involves at least one Knowledge (Hypertechnology) check and at least one Use Magic Device check (how many of each varies by device) before three failures in total. Remember that having a Hypertech Bracer grants a +10 bonus on UMD checks to use hypertech devices and treats you as trained in UMD for this purpose. These checks have a DC determined by the persuasion diplomacy variant. The hypertooth interface and the core count as a group for the purposes of the Wisdom bonus to the DC. It takes 1 round to hack for every 2 checks made in the attempt (round up to the later round), with the 2 skill checks made at the end of each round. That means that it takes a full-round action to start, and you make the rolls at the start of your next turn and cannot be interrupted (as if concentrating on a 0-level spell) or you fail the entire complex skill check. If you succeed with no failures, you’re treated as a super-administrator of that device (although the device’s actual capabilities are limited), akin to a fanatic attitude. With one failure, you’re treated as a regular administrator, and it treats you with a helpful attitude. With two failures, you might have some difficulty using the device but it’s at least responsive, treating you with a friendly attitude.

If a device is equipped with a Cyberspace Access Point, opening it then allows anyone (or specific creatures, at the device’s choice) to login to the core’s cyberspace with their Avatar. Cyberspace is an abstraction that represents the core’s memory and functions. The player’s mind makes sense of the complex technological activity by tricking the player’s senses, albeit at 60 times the normal speed of perception. A locked door in cyberspace is a password, traps and hostile creatures in cyberspace are security measures, and friendly creatures are data handlers and terminals. Usually, Cyberspace Access Points that require hacking to become accessible have no ability to connect to a Wide Area Network (WAN). However, they may have the capability to tunnel into (and allow a hacker to access) the cyberspaces of other hypertechnology on the Local Area Network (LAN).

Knowledge (Xenolore)

A class skill to anyone with “Knowledge (Dungeoneering)” or “Knowledge (Nature)” in their class skill list. This skill represents an intuition about never-before-seen alien cultures. While you are always told that this will involve a Knowledge (Xenolore) check, the GM makes this check secretly using your modifier. You’re still allowed to press your luck (which is also rolled secretly by the GM) so long as you’re actively “attempting to intuit the answer”.

Failing the DC by 5 or more gives you a significantly wrong intuition about the subject. Every additional 5 failed below the DC makes the intuition you receive even worse. (The GM should not reveal that this is wrong, but if multiple allies attempt the roll, use the best result as usual).

Profession (Sailor)

Earning money as a sailor isn’t exactly conducive to a campaign, as that could take weeks or months. Any class skill list entry for Profession (Sailor) can instead refer to Knowledge (Hypertechnology). Any class, race, feat, or other effect that refers to Profession (Sailor) can instead refer to any skill checks related to space travel, and knowledge checks related to spaceports and exotic planets.

Skill Descriptions

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